Monday May 10, 2021
| Last update: Monday at 11:27 AM

March through Minneapolis Latino community to say “Vote no!”

By Brad Sigal |
November 3, 2012
Read more articles in
Nov. 3 Latino community march says "vote no!" on both amendments
Nov. 3 Latino community march says "vote no!" on both amendments (Fight Back! News/Staff)

Minneapolis, MN - More than 50 people, mostly Latino, marched through the Latino community today to encourage people to vote no on the Voter ID amendment and the anti-gay marriage amendment. The two proposed amendments to the state constitution will be on the Minnesota ballot Nov. 6. They are proposed and promoted by the right wing. Polls are very close for both amendments, so mobilizing people to turn out to vote against them is at a fevered pitch.

The march, themed “My Community, My Voice, My Future” started at the corner of Bloomington Avenue and Lake Street, then marched north through Phillips neighborhood to the Waite House Community Center. The festive march was mostly in Spanish and featured speakers, chanting and music that kept the group animated and led many curious people to look out of their apartments and houses to see what it was about. Many neighbors signaled their agreement.

The purpose of the march was to educate and mobilize the Latino community about why it’s important to vote no on both the anti-gay marriage amendment and the Voter ID, or voter suppression, amendment. People participated from the Latino gay community, Latino religious groups that support equality, Latino women’s groups and many who are active in the immigrant rights movement.

Along the way the march stopped at Little Earth, a Native American housing complex, where Native organizers there welcomed the group and said they’re also working to mobilize Native people against the Voter ID amendment because if it passes it’s possible that Native Tribal IDs won’t be recognized as legitimate identification for voting anymore.

Community activist Francisco Segovia helped organize the march. He said, “Members of the Latino community were able to come out and express their opinions about these amendments, in the heart of the Latino barrio. There were a lot of people, including a lot of young people who expressed themselves. It was a success in bringing forward people to involve themselves in this campaign and it brought together many groups. The number of new Latino community leaders keeps growing.”

inspectorrandoness