Saturday November 1, 2014
| Last update: Friday at 11:32 PM
BY staff | Chicago, IL | 3/11/12
Over 100 people rallied and marched here March 10 at Daley Plaza. They came to defend civil liberties, demand an end to suppression of dissent and to call for a stop of government attacks on immigrant, Arab, Muslim, Black and Latino communities.
BY staff | Minneapolis, MN | 3/03/12
On March 2, protesters gathered at the Minneapolis Federal Building to show their solidarity with veteran Chicano leader Carlos Montes as he was in court in Los Angeles.
BY Charla Schlueter | Los Angeles, CA | 3/03/12
Early on the morning of March 2, supporters of veteran Chicano activist Carlos Montes gathered outside the downtown Los Angeles courthouse.
BY Kelly O'Brien | Minneapolis, MN | 2/22/12
More than 200 people gathered here at the 400 Bar, Feb. 18 for a benefit show and CD release party, to support anti-war and international solidarity activists who are facing FBI repression.
BY Mick Kelly | Chicago, IL | 2/18/12
“We flooded the Chicago U.S. Attorney’s office with phone calls demanding that they stop investigating anti-war and international solidarity activists,” says Tom Burke of the Committee to Stop FBI Repression, describing a Feb. 16 national call-in day.
BY Mick Kelly | Brooklyn Center, MN | 2/18/12
Protesters gathered outside the new headquarters of the FBI here, Feb. 17, to protest the agency’s targeting of anti-war and international solidarity activists. The protest coincided with the FBI’s announced move-in day to their new fortress-like building.
BY staff | Los Angeles, CA | 2/09/12
Veteran Chicano leader Carlos Montes was back in court here, Feb. 8, winning a small legal victory.
BY staff | Los Angeles, CA | 1/29/12
“In the interests of justice this case should be dismissed,” said attorney Jorge Gonzales, lawyer for veteran Chicano leader Carlos Montes, in Los Angeles Superior Court, Jan. 24.
BY Committee to Stop FBI Repression | North Carolina | 1/22/12
The Committee to Stop FBI Repression condemns the sentencing last week of three young Muslim men in North Carolina to between 15 and 45 years in prison each.
BY staff | Washington D.C. | 1/03/12
President Obama signed the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (NDAA), which includes provisions that allow for indefinite military detention without trial, on Dec.31.
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