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Rally outside Duval County courthouse demands 'Justice for D'Angelo Stallworth'

Protesters calling on state attorney to indict two killer cops
By Dave Schneider |
June 30, 2015
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Latrelle Worth gives a speech to the Justice for D'Angelo Stallworth rally.
Latrelle Worth gives a speech to the Justice for D'Angelo Stallworth rally outside the Duval County courthouse (Photo by Dave Schneider)

Jacksonville, FL - More than 50 people gathered outside the Duval County courthouse to demand justice for D'Angelo Stallworth, the 28-year-old African American man murdered by Jacksonville police in May. The crowd assembled around noon, carrying signs and wearing t-shirts with the slogan “Justice 4 Dee.”

Stallworth, father of three, was shot six times by two white police officers, who claimed that they thought D'Angelo looked suspicious. He was unarmed at the time of the shooting and an independent autopsy ordered by the family indicates that police shot him in the back as he ran away - in other words, executing him.

“We have no answers, and today, we will not be silent,” said Latrelle Worth, the girlfriend of D'Angelo and mother of one of his children, in a speech during the rally. She continued, “No matter how they try to put us away and try to erase the story, we will not be erased. Today and forever, we are D'Angelo Stallworth, and we will stand at the forefront of this courthouse and anywhere in Jacksonville, Florida to promote justice for D'Angelo Stallworth. We want answers!”

Worth's comments focused on the complete lack of action by State Attorney Angela Corey in the month and a half since the two officers murdered D'Angelo. Corey has not charged either officer, and the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office (JSO) has not released their names to the public.

The high-energy crowd vocally blasted the lack of action by Corey, whose 4th Judicial Circuit leads the state of Florida in the incarceration of juveniles, particularly African Americans. Chants of, “Angela Corey, where are you? We see you!” and “Hey hey, ho ho, these killer cops have got to go,” drew enthusiasm from everyone at the rally.

When asked, many at the rally showed skepticism that Corey will give into the people's demands, because of her close relationship with the police. When she initially won the office of State Attorney in 2008, Corey was endorsed by the Jacksonville Fraternal Order of Police. In pure campaign donations alone, at least 10% of the $534,507.75 she raised came from police officers or their families in 2008, according to research by the Jacksonville Progressive Coalition (JPC) and records from the Florida Division of Elections.

“They want us to stay at home and not ask, 'What is happening? What is wrong with this country today?'” asked Tefa Galvis, a lead organizer with the JPC. She continued, “The only way we are going to get justice is if we stand together, if we get organized and if we unite our community to go outside and demand that Angela Corey and JSO stop these attacks.”

The family and friends of D'Angelo plan to hold further protests demanding justice, including a march on Angela Corey's office in downtown Jacksonville. Details on upcoming actions can be found on the “Justice 4 D'Angelo” Facebook page.

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