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1000 rally and march against police brutality in Salt Lake City

By Ian Decker |
December 1, 2014
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Huge march against police violence in Salt Lake City
Huge march against police violence in Salt Lake City (Fight Back! News/Staff)

Salt Lake City, UT - More than 1000 people rallied in front of the Wallace Bennett Federal Building on Nov. 29 to stand in solidarity with the people of Ferguson in their fight for justice. Protesters were both mournful about the police murder of Mike Brown and furious about the failure of the Ferguson grand jury to indict Brown’s killer. The large turnout in Salt Lake City is due to killer cops and police brutality in Utah, where many families are suffering injustices.

The first speaker, Bárbara Ochoa, stated to the crowd's roar of approval, “Ferguson is not in a state of chaos, but a state of revolution.”

Another speaker, Karen Rodriguez said, “This is our time! This is our civil rights movement!” Her speech was interrupted by long applause.

The crowd chanted, “Dare to struggle, dare to win, never silent, never again!” reflecting protest leaders’ and families’ promises that this movement does not end with this protest. Organizers see this as the beginning of a long campaign to get justice for victims of police brutality in Utah.

Asked about the campaign for justice, Chris Manor, organizer for Utah Against Police Brutality said, “There is a truth in this situation - killer cops will no longer be able to get away with murder.”

The rally turned into a march that blocked streets and intersections. First, there was a march to the Matheson Court house, then a march to the Public Safety Building. When arriving at the Public Safety Building the protesters shouted, “From Ferguson to SLC, end police brutality!”

"There is no safety in the Public Safety Building. There is no justice in the courts. We need to look out for each other and there is only justice in the streets!” said Gregory Lucero of the Freedom Road Socialist Organization.

Protesters then marched back to the Federal Building where, in an effort to curb any attempts by the police to intimidate or repress the movement, Gregory Lucero led one last chant and then advised, “When an officer asks you about what somebody did, or who did something, what is the correct response, regardless of what you thought of it? I am happy not to talk to you.”