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Welfare Rights Committee Wages Air War, Slams House Republicans in TV Ad Campaign!

by Linden Gawboy |
April 2, 2002
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Minneapolis, MN - The Welfare Rights Committee has taken to the airwaves (and cable networks) to pound anti-poor politicians.

Television ads calling for passage of the moratorium on the 5-year lifetime limit on public assistance started airing in metro and greater Minnesota in mid-March. The WRC ad slams the House Republicans for their failure to take the action needed to prevent thousands of children and their caregivers from being forced off welfare July 1, 2002. Hundreds of ads have been broadcast so far.

In the ads, a young girl wrapped in a blanket and holding a teddy bear walks down the railroad tracks under a bridge. The words "6,000 children", "recession", "unemployment" and "a moratorium would save these kids" flash on the screen as the narrator talks:

On July 1st, up to 6000 Minnesota children and their families will lose public assistance. The recession and rising unemployment are making things worse. Placing a moratorium on the 5-year limit on welfare would save these kids from homelessness and hunger. House Republicans are refusing to deal with this issue. Call your legislator today and tell them to support a moratorium. Kids' lives depend on it.

The ad ends with the girl gazing seriously into the camera.

The Welfare Rights Committee created the 30-second spot with the help of volunteer filmmakers. WRC member Alex Pflepsen, age 9, is the girl in the ad. Welfare Rights is in the midst of successful fundraising drive to buy more airtime. "We are playing it over and over in the home districts of the nastiest House republicans," said Kim Hosmer of WRC, "we need to expose them where they live, and around the state."

"If Representative Goodno is home in Moorhead watching the Leno show tonight, he's going to get our message loud and clear," said Trishalla Bell of the Welfare Rights Committee.

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