Monday July 28, 2014
| Last update: Monday at 12:57 PM
BY Adam Price | San José, CA | 7/17/09
On July 2, the Labor Department announced that another 467,000 jobs were lost in June as the official unemployment rate rose to 9.5%.
BY Daniel Ginsberg | Moline, IL | 7/10/09
"Wells Fargo, shame on you!" chanted the crowd of over 125 as eleven brave protesters blocked the road outside Wells Fargo here, July 9.
BY Mick Kelly | St. Paul, MN | 7/02/09
More than 50 people rallied in front of the Governor’s Mansion here, June 30 to slam Governor Pawlenty’s plan to cut hundreds of millions from health care, education, local government aid and human services.
BY Michael Graham | Asheville, NC | 7/01/09
People from all over western North Carolina protested here in Pritchard Park, June 27, to demand a single payer system in which health care is provided to all people, with those able to paying their fair share.
BY staff | Minneapolis, MN | 6/25/09
On Thursday, June 25, friends and supporters gathered at the home of Rosemary Williams to plan for action after getting devastating news.
BY Kosta Harlan | Raleigh, NC | 6/21/09
“We’re in the middle of an historic crisis,” the president of the North Carolina Public Sector Workers Union (UE 150), Angaza Laughinghouse, told Fight Back!.
BY Linden Gawboy | Minneapolis, MN | 6/16/09
“You got bailed out, we got sold out! Stop foreclosures now!” was the rallying call during a protest here June 13 as a crowd of 75 people surged to the doors of a US Bank branch on Lake Street.
BY Carlos Montes | Los Angeles, CA | 6/16/09
The Los Angeles United School District (LAUSD) Board voted 4-3 to lay off 2000 teachers and to carry out other cutbacks, forcing the teachers and community to face the brunt of the economic crisis.
BY Stephanie Weiner | Chicago, IL | 6/13/09
Quad City Die Casting workers and their supporters marched and rallied here, June 11, in front of the office of Wells Fargo.
BY Fight Back! Editors | United States | 6/12/09
In the midst of the Great Depression of the 1930s autoworkers organized into the United Auto Workers (UAW) through a wave of sit-down strikes and pitched battles with local police and company goons.
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